FENDER ELECTRIC BASS GUITARS | Derringers Music Store | Adelaide Australia

Fender Electric Bass Guitars

Following the success of the first commercially successful solid body electric guitar, the Fender Telecaster, Leo Fender wanted to create a companion bass product. The Fender Precision Bass prototype was created in 1950 by Fender and first saw production in 1951.

The Fender Precision Bass

When Fender created the Precision Bass, the music market was playing orchestral-sized double basses which were both cumbersome and vulnerable to damage during transport. In the post-World War II era, the popular music industry was shifting to amplified instruments. Large bodied jazz guitars were being fitted with electric pickups and the resultant feedback issues of these modified acoustic instruments were becoming an increasing problem. The feedback problem results from the acoustic instrument acting like a microphone and regenerating a signal path from the PA or amplifier speakers back through the sound system. WIth the generation of modified acoustic instruments, the problem was becoming worse and no greater problem existed than with the orchestral-sized acoustic bass. In effect, it was an eight cubic-foot microphone that was causing on-stage problems. Leo Fender had solved the feedback issues for guitars with his Fender Telecaster and the introduction of the Fender Precision Bass that was built on the same principles was set to revolutionize the music world and make the popular music bass player’s life a whole lot easier.

The original Precision Bass of 1951 drew on the design features of the Telecaster guitar but also paved the way for the more smooth and sculpted design that would become the Fender Stratocaster in 1956. When that guitar was released, the Precision Bass design was rationalised to share many visual similarities with the new guitar, including the round heel block and pickguard style.

The Precision Bass featured a split-coil pickup system with staggered pole pieces that was more a result of the Gibson-held patent on the popular Seth Lover designed Humbucker pickup. The staggered poles were connected in a hum-bucking configuration in effect, creating a modern pickup without violating the Seth Lover patent. That said, the Precision Bass’s pickup produced a very pleasing tone and, as it is still to this day, very popular with bassists of all genres.

The Fender Precision bass is available with both Rosewood and lacquered capped fingerboards.

The Fender Jazz Bass

In 1960 a new model bass called the Deluxe Model was introduced as a bass companion product to the Jazzmaster guitar. This shorter scale-length bass was later renamed the Jazz Bass and has proven to be Fender’s second-most popular bass. The Jazz Bass features different signal techniques and production than its older cousin. The single-coil pickups give a more midrange and treble and suppressing the Precision Bass’s emphasis on fundamental frequency. In no-technical terms, the Jazz Bass is more “in your face” than the Precision, with the latter being a smoother sound for a musical combo. The Jazz Bass is popular with funk, disco, reggae, blues, punk, heavy metal and jazz fusion.

Check out the range of Fender Precision and Jazz basses at Derringers Music, your home of Fender Musical Instruments in Australia.

FENDER ELECTRIC BASS GUITARS | Derringers Music Store | Adelaide Australia

Fender Electric Bass Guitars

Following the success of the first commercially successful solid body electric guitar, the Fender Telecaster, Leo Fender wanted to create a companion bass product. The Fender Precision Bass prototype was created in 1950 by Fender and first saw production in 1951.

The Fender Precision Bass

When Fender created the Precision Bass, the music market was playing orchestral-sized double basses which were both cumbersome and vulnerable to damage during transport. In the post-World War II era, the popular music industry was shifting to amplified instruments. Large bodied jazz guitars were being fitted with electric pickups and the resultant feedback issues of these modified acoustic instruments were becoming an increasing problem. The feedback problem results from the acoustic instrument acting like a microphone and regenerating a signal path from the PA or amplifier speakers back through the sound system. WIth the generation of modified acoustic instruments, the problem was becoming worse and no greater problem existed than with the orchestral-sized acoustic bass. In effect, it was an eight cubic-foot microphone that was causing on-stage problems. Leo Fender had solved the feedback issues for guitars with his Fender Telecaster and the introduction of the Fender Precision Bass that was built on the same principles was set to revolutionize the music world and make the popular music bass player’s life a whole lot easier.

The original Precision Bass of 1951 drew on the design features of the Telecaster guitar but also paved the way for the more smooth and sculpted design that would become the Fender Stratocaster in 1956. When that guitar was released, the Precision Bass design was rationalised to share many visual similarities with the new guitar, including the round heel block and pickguard style.

The Precision Bass featured a split-coil pickup system with staggered pole pieces that was more a result of the Gibson-held patent on the popular Seth Lover designed Humbucker pickup. The staggered poles were connected in a hum-bucking configuration in effect, creating a modern pickup without violating the Seth Lover patent. That said, the Precision Bass’s pickup produced a very pleasing tone and, as it is still to this day, very popular with bassists of all genres.

The Fender Precision bass is available with both Rosewood and lacquered capped fingerboards.

The Fender Jazz Bass

In 1960 a new model bass called the Deluxe Model was introduced as a bass companion product to the Jazzmaster guitar. This shorter scale-length bass was later renamed the Jazz Bass and has proven to be Fender’s second-most popular bass. The Jazz Bass features different signal techniques and production than its older cousin. The single-coil pickups give a more midrange and treble and suppressing the Precision Bass’s emphasis on fundamental frequency. In no-technical terms, the Jazz Bass is more “in your face” than the Precision, with the latter being a smoother sound for a musical combo. The Jazz Bass is popular with funk, disco, reggae, blues, punk, heavy metal and jazz fusion.

Check out the range of Fender Precision and Jazz basses at Derringers Music, your home of Fender Musical Instruments in Australia.

FENDER ELECTRIC BASS GUITARS
Minimal Price: $2399.00