Gretsch G9470 Claraphone Banjo-Ukulele

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Gretsch G9470 Claraphone Banjo-Ukulele

2730010521
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Description

With a sparkling good-time sound and feel the Gretsch G9470 Clarophone Banjo-Uke displays solid modern craftsmanship while authentically evoking the company's innovative banjo models of the early 20th century. Sized like a concert ukulele, the Clarophone Banjo-Uke, or banjolele, is the perfect travelling companion for the banjo enthusiast and is commonly tuned GCEA ("C Tuning") or ADF#B ("D Tuning"), with a re-entrant 4th string. It has a maple plywood rim and resonator for increased volume. The hard maple neck and fingerboard has pearloid position markers for precise fingering. This Clarophone Banjo-Uke is a splendid Southern surfeit of outstanding sound, performance and value for established artist, seasoned player and eager student alike.

Gretsch is proud to take players on a musical journey through nearly a century of great Gretsch history by introducing its Roots Collection of acoustic instruments. This exciting family of banjos, mandolins, resonator guitars, ukuleles and Rancher acoustic guitars feature classically authentic Gretsch designs that transport players to a bygone era well before the company made its acclaimed 1950s entry into the electric guitar world.

Features
  • Concert size
  • Hard maple neck & fingerboard
  • Vintage soft "U" neck shape
  • Aged pearloid position markers
  • Maple plywood resonator
  • Maple plywood rim
  • 12 brakets
  • "No-knot" tailpiece
  • Fiber skin head
  • Nickel hardware
Manufacture
Gretsch

Gretsch musical instrument production began in 1883 when Friedrich Gretsch, a German immigrant, set up a shop in Brooklyn for the manufacture of banjos, tambourines and drums. The company was immediately prosperous, but in 1895 Friedrich Gretsch died at 39 and his 15-year-old son, Fred, took over. By 1916 Fred Gretsch had moved the company into a 10-story building at 60 Broadway in Brooklyn and become one of America's leading importers and manufacturers of musical instruments. At this time, Gretsch still produced very few guitars, because there was little market for guitars. The banjo reigned supreme until well into the big-band era, when the archtop guitar came to the fore. Gretsch responded with the Synchromatic line. When Fred Gretsch retired in 1942 his son William took over until Fred Gretsch, Jr. took the helm in 1948. Fred Jr. went on to lead the company through its guitar heyday. The golden years... Gretsch had dabbled in electric guitars prior to 1955, producing a limited number of Hawaiian lap steels and the Electromatic arch-tops, among other models, but around 1954 the Golden Age of Gretsch guitars began. In quick succession the Electromatic evolved into the Country Club, the Jet solidbodies were introduced and two of Gretsch's best-loved models, the 6120 Chet Atkins model and the White Falcon hit the market. Retailing for $385 new, the 6120 featured twin DeArmond pickups, a Bigsby vibrato, and a big G brand on the top. Although the 6120 was originally directed at the country market, it has been favored by rock and rollers from Eddie Cochran to Pete Townshend to Brian Setzer. The 6121 Chet Atkins model, released at the same time, followed the Jet model: it looked like a solid body, but underneath the cap, the mahogany body was extensively routed. [thegretschpages.com/history]

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